Today In History – April 30, 2012

  1812 – There aren’t many states that can boast an abundance of pelicans, but Louisiana, the 18th state to enter the United States of America, has plenty. That’s why it calls itself the Pelican State and the state bird is the eastern brown pelican. Named in honor of Louis XIV of France, Louisiana has several other nicknames: Sportsman’s Paradise, Sugar State, and Creole State. The capital of Louisiana is Baton Rouge and the beautiful magnolia is its adopted flower while the state tree is the bald cypress. All together now, let’s sing You are My Sunshine, Louisiana’s state song. Give Me Louisiana is also considered a state song, and the state motto is: Union, justice and confidence. We’re not too confident in choosing which song to sing, though.

1889 – The first national holiday in the United States was celebrated. The citizens of the U.S. observed the centennial of George Washington’s inauguration. Although this is no longer a national holiday, you’ll be happy to know that there are now at least half a dozen holidays — most on Mondays — that give folks in the U.S. a day off from work and a reason to have a parade, picnic, or go shopping at the mall to take advantage of the holiday sales. These national holidays include: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King’s Birthday, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veteran’s Day and Thanksgiving Day.

1900 – Train engineer Casey Jones was killed when trying to save the Cannonball Express as it highballed its way through Vaughn, MS. The famous song about Jones is loosely relatable to the train accident which cost the railroad engineer his life.

1903 – Victor Records made its first Red Seal recording this day. The premiere disk featured Ada Crossley, an opera contralto.

1922 – Charlie Robertson of the Chicago White Sox pitched the major league’s fifth perfect game. The Chisox defeated the Detroit Tigers, 2-0.

1939 – The first railroad car equipped with fluorescent lights was put into service. The train car was known as the General Pershing Zephyr.

1939- Baseball’s ‘Iron Horse’, Lou Gehrig, played his last game with the New York Yankees on this day.

1939 – Public Television began. President Franklin D. Roosevelt became the first chief executive to appear on TV. Roosevelt spoke at the opening ceremonies of the New York World’s Fair in Flushing, NY on WNBT in New York.

1940 – Jimmy Dorsey and his band recorded the bandleader’s signature song, Contrasts, for Decca Records. The song went on to become one of the most familiar big band themes of the era.

1940 – Belle Martell was licensed in California by state boxing officials to be the first American woman prize-fight referee!

1944 – The New York Giants (of baseball) whipped the Brooklyn Dodgers 26-8. They also set a major-league record for runs driven in by a team in a single game.

1945 – “How would you like to be queen for a day!” That opening line, delivered by host, Jack Bailey, was first heard on Mutual radio on this day. The first Queen for a Day was Mrs. Evelyn Lane. Years later Bailey would take the show to TV for a long, popular run.

1945 – Arthur Godfrey began his CBS radio morning show. His theme was Seems Like Old Times. Arthur Godfrey Time ran until this very same day in 1972. Godfrey’s show was different in that he used live talent and not records. His popularity with listeners was the major reason that several sponsors gave Godfrey the freedom to ad-lib their commercials and, from time to time, joke about the products as well.

1947 – Maps had to be changed as Boulder Dam was changed back to its original name, Hoover Dam. Some people, mostly those who live in the community of Boulder, Nevada, still refer to the dam as Boulder Dam. Many of them think that changing the dam’s name was a damn shame.

1953 – Frank Sinatra and Nelson Riddle became a team this day at Capitol Records in Hollywood. Sinatra’s new musical style, under Riddle’s direction, brought the crooner to the top of the record world for the second time in his illustrious career.

1964 – TV sets would be drastically different after a ruling by the FCC stating that all TV receivers should be equipped to receive both VHF (channels 2-13) and the new UHF (channels 14-83). As a result, TV dealers scrambled to unload their VHF-only models as fast as possible. Antenna manufacturers were kept busy, as the new UHF receivers required new antennas too.

1975 – Saigon — and all of Vietnam — fell into communist hands this day, the unofficial end of the Vietnam War. As the U.S. withdrew completely from Saigon, the old noncommunist capital fell to North Vietnamese tanks. Americans commemorate the fall of Saigon with memorial services for the 58,153 Americans who died in Southeast Asia during the war.

1985 – The National Basketball Association set an all-time season attendance record as 19,506,355 fans attended games in arenas around the league. Seven NBA cities — Boston, Chicago, Houston, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles and Philadelphia — drew over a million fans each in the 1984-85 basketball season.

1987 – Three more compact discs of music by The Beatles went on sale for the first time. The discs were Help!, Rubber Soul and Revolver. All became hits again for the Fab Four.

Birthdays
April 30
1899 – Ellis Wilson
artist: Guggenheim Fellowship winner [1944]; The Open Market of Charleston, Haitian Funeral Procession; died Jan 1, 1977

1908 – Eve Arden (Eunice Quedens)
Emmy Award-winning actress: Our Miss Brooks [1953], Anatomy of a Murder, Grease, Stage Door, Tea for Two; died Nov 12, 1990

1914 – Vermont Royster
Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, editor: The Wall Street Journal; columnist: Thinking Things Over; author: Journey through the Soviet Union, A Pride of Prejudices, My Own, My Country’s Time: A Journalist’s Journey; died July 22, 1996

1916 – Robert Shaw
conductor: Robert Shaw Chorale; music director of Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus; died Jan 25, 1999

1923 – Percy Heath
jazz musician: bass: founder of Modern Jazz Quartet; group: The Heath Brothers; died Apr 27, 2005

1923 – Al Lewis (Albert Meister)
actor: The Munsters, Car 54 Where are You?, My Grandpa is a Vampire, Married to the Mob; died Feb 3, 2006

1926 – Cloris Leachman
Academy Award-winning actress: The Last Picture Show [1971]; Emmy Award-winner: A Brand New Life [1972-73], The Mary Tyler Moore Show [1973-74], Cher [1974-75], Screen Actor’s Guild 50th Anniversary Celebration [1983-84]; Phyllis, Backstairs at the White House, The Facts of Life

1933 – Willie Nelson
singer: see Willie Nelson Day [above]

1938 – Gary Collins
actor: Born Free, The Iron Horse, Roots, The Sixth Sense, The Wackiest Ship in the Army

1940 – Burt Young
actor: Excessive Force, A Family Matter, Rocky series, Once Upon a Time in America, Convoy, Chinatown, Cinderella Liberty, Roomies

1941 – Johnny Farina
musician: rhythm guitar: group: Santo & Johnny: Sleepwalk, Tear Drop

1943 – Bobby Vee (Robert Velline)
singer: Devil or Angel, Rubber Ball, Take Good Care of My Baby, Run to Him, The Night Has a Thousand Eyes, Come Back when You Grow Up

1944 – Jill Clayburgh
actress: An Unmarried Woman, Luna, Portnoy’s Complaint, Semi-Tough, The Silver Streak, Terminal Man, Firestorm: 72 Hours in Oakland, Honor Thy Father and Mother; died Nov 5, 2010

1944 – Richard Shoff
singer: group: The Sandpipers: Guantanamera, Come Saturday Morning

1946 – Don Schollander
Olympic Hall of Famer: 1st swimmer to win 4 gold medals in one Olympics [1964], also won two gold in 1968; International Swimming Hall of Famer: set 8 world records in the 400-meter freestyle and 9 in the 200-meter in his career; Sullivan Award (U.S. outstanding athlete [1964]

1948 – Perry King
actor: A Cry in the Night, Kaleidoscope, The Lord’s of Flatbush, Mandingo, Search and Destroy, Switch

1953 – Merrill Osmond
singer: [w/Jessica Boucher]: You’re Here to Remember, I’m Here to Forget; group: The Osmonds: Anytime; brother of Alan, Donny, Jay, Marie, Wayne, Jimmy

1967 – Turbo B (Durron Butler)
rap singer: group: Snap

Click to Order Those Were the Days Deluxe

Chart Toppers
April 30
1944
I Love You – Bing Crosby
It’s Love, Love, Love – The Guy Lombardo Orchestra (vocal: Skip Nelson)
San Fernando Valley – Bing Crosby
Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry – Al Dexter

1952
Wheel of Fortune – Kay Starr
Anytime – Eddie Fisher
Blacksmith Blues – Ella Mae Morse
(When You Feel like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There – Carl Smith

1960
Stuck on You – Elvis Presley
Sink the Bismarck – Johnny Horton
Sixteen Reasons – Connie Stevens
He’ll Have to Go – Jim Reeves

1968
Honey – Bobby Goldsboro
Cry like a Baby – The Box Tops
Young Girl – The Union Gap
The Legend of Bonnie and Clyde – Merle Haggard

1976
Disco Lady – Johnnie Taylor
Let Your Love Flow – Bellamy Brothers
Right Back Where We Started From – Maxine Nightingale
Together Again – Emmylou Harris

1984
Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) – Phil Collins
Hello – Lionel Richie
Hold Me Now – The Thompson Twins
Right or Wrong – George Strait

Today In History – April 26, 2012

Events
April 26
1803 – Over 2,300 meteorite stones, weighing between one quarter ounce and 20 pounds, rained down on the people of L’Aigle in northeastern France. The meteorites poured down along an 8-mile-long strip in this little town, 100 miles west of Paris. No one was hurt; but it was the first time scientists could verify that stones could come from outer space.

1921 – Weather broadcasts were heard for the first time on radio when WEW in St. Louis, MO aired weather news. Weather forecasts continue to be the top reason why people listen to radio; rating higher than music, news, sports and commercials! A sunny day to you wherever you may be on the planet…

1932 – Ed Wynn was heard on radio’s Texaco Star Theater for the first time. Wynn, a popular vaudeville performer, demanded a live audience to react to his humor if he was to make the switch to radio. The network consented and Wynn became radio’s first true superstar. He would later make the switch to TV.

1937 – This was a tragic day in history as German planes attacked the town of Guernica in Northern Spain. Without warning, the planes swooped down on the sleepy village, subjecting the citizens to three hours of continuous bombing. The village was left in flames; those who survived the bombs and tried to escape to surrounding fields were shot down by machine-gun fire from the air.

1937 – The publisher of LIFE magazine just about passed out when he looked at his just-off-the-press publication and noticed that someone had forgotten to put the word “LIFE” in the upper left-hand corner! It was the only time that LIFE was nameless. Since hundreds of thousands of copies were already printed, the magazine hit the streets with no name on the cover! The reason? A picture of a rooster would have had an obscured comb if the logotype had been used in the upper left-hand corner as usual.

1937 – The initial broadcast of Lorenzo Jones was heard over NBC radio this day. Karl Swenson played the lead role for the entire run of the serial. And quite a run it was. Lorenzo Jones was on the air until 1955.

1952 – Patty Berg set a new record for major women’s golf competition. She shot a 64 over 18 holes in a tournament in Richmond, California.

1954 – Grace Kelly, “Hollywood’s brightest and busiest star,” was seen on the cover of LIFE magazine. In a couple of years, the actress would leave the U.S. to become Princess Grace of Monaco.

1964 – The Boston Celtics wrapped up an unprecedented sixth consecutive NBA championship. The Celtics still had two more crowns to win, however, before the string would come to an end.

1970 – The musical, Company, opened on Broadway. It ran for 705 performances before parting company with appreciative audiences at the Alvin Theatre in New York City. Company starred Elaine Stritch.

1975 – On top of the Billboard popular music chart was B.J. Thomas, with the longest title ever for a number one song. (Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song was number one for one week, though it took that long just to say the title.

1983 – For the first time, the Dow Jones industrial average moved over the 1200 mark, just two months after smashing the 1100 barrier.

1986 – At 1:23 a.m. in Pripyat in the Ukraine when the Chernobyl atomic power station exploded. A three-hundred-square-mile area was evacuated in an attempt to protect over 100,000 residents of the area from radiation poisoning. 31 people died and unknown thousands were exposed as the radioactive material carried in the atmosphere spread throughout the world.

1987 – Tennis star Chris Evert won her 150th career tennis tournament. She beat Martina Navratilova in Houston, Texas.

Birthdays
April 26
1785 – John James Audubon
ornithologist, artist: the original Birdman; died Jan 27, 1851

1822 – Frederick Law Olmsted
landscape architect: Yosemite National Park, Central Park in New York City and other city parks in Boston, MA, Hartford, CT and Louisville, KY; died Aug 28, 1903

1882 – Jessie Redmon Fauset
author: There is Confusion, Plum Bun, The Chinaberry Tree, Comedy, American Style; literary editor: Crisis [NAACP publication]; co-publisher & editor: The Brownie Book; died Apr 30, 1961

1886 – Gertrude ‘Ma’ Rainey (Gertrude Malissa Nix Pridgett)
‘Mother of the Blues’: singer: C.C. Rider [aka See See Rider], Jelly Bean Blues, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, Bo Weavil Blues; died Dec 22, 1939

1893 – Anita Loos
author, playwright: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, I Married an Angel, San Francisco, Saratoga, The Women; died Aug 18, 1981

1897 – Douglas Sirk (Claus Detlef Sierck)
director: Imitation of Life, A Time to Love & a Time to Die, Tarnished Angels, Written on the Wind, Magnificent Obsession, First Legion; died Jan 14, 1987

1900 – Charles Francis Richter
seismologist: invented the Richter scale for measuring the magnitude of earthquakes; died Apr 30, 1985

1917 – Sal (Salvatore Anthony) Maglie
‘The Barber’: baseball: pitcher: NY Giants [all-star: 1951, 1952/World Series: 1951, 1954], Cleveland Indians, Brooklyn Dodgers [World Series: 1956], NY Yankees, SL Cardinals; died Dec 28, 1992

1924 – (Theodore Marcus) Teddy Edwards
jazz musician: tenor sax: Me and My Lover; died Apr 20, 2003

1926 – Bambi Linn (Linnemier)
dancer, actress: Your Show of Shows, Oklahoma!

1927 – John Ralston
football: coach: Cal State Univ at San Jose, Stanford Univ; Coach/GM: Denver Broncos

1933 – Carol Burnett
Emmy Award-winning comedienne, actress: Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall [1962-1963], Carol & Company [1962-1963], Mad About You [1996-1997]; The Carol Burnett Show, Carol Burnett and Friends, The Garry Moore Show

1937 – Robert Boozer
basketball: Kansas State Univ., U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team [1960 gold medal]

1938 – Nino Benvenuti
International Boxing Hall of Famer: European Junior Middleweight title [1957, 1959], Olympic boxing gold medal [Rome, 1960], Junior Middleweight Champ [1965-1966], Ring Magazine Fighter of the Year [1968]; Middleweight Champ [1967-1970]; retired in 1971, total bouts: 90: won 82, lost 7, tied 1, knockouts 35

1938 – Maurice Williams
singer, songwriter: group: Zodiacs: Stay

1938 – Duane Eddy
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame guitarist: Rebel-’rouser, Forty Miles of Bad Road, Because They’re Young, Theme from Peter Gunn; actor: Because They’re Young, A Thunder of Drums, The Wild Westerners, The Savage Seven, Kona Coast

1941 – Claudine Clark
singer: Party Lights

1941 – (Dr.) Gary Cuozzo
football: Univ of Virginia all-American; NFL: QB: Baltimore Colts, NO Saints, Minnesota Vikings [Super Bowl IV], SL Cardinals; orthodontist [with his son] in Middletown NJ

1941 – Bruce MacGregor
hockey: NHL: Detroit Red Wings, NY Rangers; VP: Edmonton Oilers

1942 – Bobby Rydell (Robert Ridarelli)
singer: Wild One, We Got Love, Swingin’ School, Kissin’ Time, Volare, Forget Him; actor: Bye Bye Birdie, That Lady from Peking

1947 – Donna De Varona
Olympic Hall of Famer: 400-meter individual swimming medley [1964]; International Swimming Hall of Famer; International Women’s Sports Hall of Famer; sportscaster; founder of Women’s Sports Foundation

1947 – Boyd Matson
TV news anchor, correspondent: U.S.A. Today-The Television Series, The Real Story; TV host: National Geographic Explorer

1947 – Amos (Joseph) Otis
baseball: NY Mets, KC Royals [all-star: 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1976], Pittsburgh Pirates [World Series: 1980]

1958 – Giancarlo Esposito
actor: The Usual Suspects, Smoke, Reckless, Blue in the Face, Malcolm X, Do the Right Thing, Sweet Lorraine, Bakersfield P.D.

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Chart Toppers
April 26
1948

Now is the Hour – Bing Crosby
Manana – Peggy Lee
The Dickey Bird Song – The Freddy Martin Orchestra (vocal: Glenn Hughes)
Anytime – Eddy Arnold

1956

Heartbreak Hotel/I Was the One – Elvis Presley
The Poor People of Paris – Les Baxter
Ivory Tower – Cathy Carr
Blue Suede Shoes – Carl Perkins

1964

Can’t Buy Me Love – The Beatles
Twist and Shout – The Beatles
Do You Want to Know a Secret – The Beatles
Understand Your Man – Johnny Cash

1972

The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face – Roberta Flack
Rockin’ Robin – Michael Jackson
I Gotcha – Joe Tex
Chantilly Lace – Jerry Lee Lewis

1980

Call Me – Blondie
Ride like the Wind – Christopher Cross
With You I’m Born Again – Billy Preston & Syreeta
A Lesson in Leavin’ – Dottie West

1988

Where Do Broken Hearts Go – Whitney Houston
Devil Inside – INXS
Wishing Well – Terence Trent D’Arby
I’ll Always Come Back – K.T. Oslin

Source: 440.com

Today In History – April 25, 2012

Press Release Distribution - Today in History1831 – The New York and Harlem Railway was incorporated in New York City.

1928 – Buddy, the first seeing eye dog, was presented to Morris S. Frank on this day. Many seeing eye organizations and schools continue to offer specially trained dogs “…to enhance the independence, dignity, and self-confidence of blind people…”

1938 – Your Family and Mine, a radio serial, was first broadcast.

1940 – W2XBS (now WCBS-TV) in New York City presented the first circus on TV. No, it wasn’t a political debate or a daytime tabloid talk show. It was a three-hour special broadcast from Madison Square Garden.

1943 – Rufus Gentry, playing for Buffalo in the International Baseball League, tied a record originally set in 1916 by winning an 11-inning, no-hitter. Buffalo defeated Newark 1-0.

1946 – The popular Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra recorded Cement Mixer for Majestic records, tapes and CDs this day. Well, not tapes and CDs. We were still listening to 78s back then … thick, heavy ones, at that.

1953 – NBC-TV presented Ethel and Albert, the video version of the popular radio show. Peg Lynch and Alan Bunce starred in the program.

1954 – The prototype manufacture of a new solar battery was announced by the Bell Laboratories in New York City.

1959 – The St. Lawrence Seaway opened to traffic, saving shippers millions of dollars. By going from the sea to the Great Lakes across upstate New York, folks no longer had to ship goods the long, costly over land.

1967 – Colorado Governor John Love signed the first law legalizing abortion in the United States. The law was limited to therapeutic abortions when agreed to, unanimously, by a panel of three physicians.

1970 – DJs around the U.S. played the new number one song, ABC, quite often, as The Jackson 5 reached the number one spot in pop music for two weeks. ABC was the second of four number one songs in a row for the group from Gary, IN. I Want You Back was their first. ABC was one of 23 hits for Michael, Tito, Jackie, Jermaine and Marlon. ABC was knocked out of first place by The Guess Who and their hit, American Woman. I’m Casey Kasem. And the countdown continues…

1972 – Bill Sharman, ending his first year as head coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, was named Coach of the Year in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Sharman had a first year record of 69 wins and 13 losses.

1973 – The group, The Sweet, received a gold record for the hit Little Willy. The English rocker band recorded four hits in addition to their first million-seller, Ballroom Blitz, Fox on the Run, Action and Love is like Oxygen. Little Willy was a top-three hit, while the group’s other gold record winner, Fox on the Run made it to the top five.

1985 – Big River (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) opened at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre on Broadway in New York City. The Tony Award-winning score for the show was written by Roger Miller (his first Broadway production). The show, about life on the Mississippi, with Daniel Jenkins in the starring role of Huck Finn, ran for 1,005 performances and won the Tony for Best Musical of the Year. Big River picked up several more Tony Awards: Featured Actor in a Musical to Ron Richardson; Best Director (Musical) to Des McAnuff; Best Book (Musical) to William Hauptman; and Best Scenic Designer and Lighting Designer to Heidi Landesman and Richard Riddell respectively.

1999 – More than 70,000 mourners gathered in Littleton, Colorado to honor the victims of the Columbine High School massacre five days earlier. “All of us must change our lives to honor these children,” Vice President Al Gore told the crowd a few blocks from the high school. “More than ever, I realize every one of us is responsible for all of the children.”

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Birthdays
April 25
1874 – Guglielmo Marconi
‘Father of Radio’: inventor: 1909 Nobel Laureate in Physics: wireless telegraphy [the transmission of Morse Code over electromagnetic energy]; died July 20, 1937

1906 – William J. Brennan Jr.
Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court: authored more than 1,200 opinions, including many landmarks: free press [New York Times v. Sullivan], women’s rights [Frontiero v. Richardson], reapportionment [Baker v. Carr], civil rights [Cooper v. Aaron, Green v. County School Board]; died July 24, 1997

1908 – Edward R. (Roscoe) Murrow
newsman: You are There, Person to Person; former head U.S. Information Agency; died Apr 27, 1965

1913 – Earl Bostic
alto sax player, bandleader: Flamingo, Sleep, You Go to My Head, Cherokee, Temptation; died Oct 28, 1965

1915 – Sal Franzella
jazz musician: alto sax, clarinet: group: Sal Franzella & the Accordionaires: Yesterdays, Oh Marie, Paradise

1916 – Jerry Barber
golfer: PGA Champion [1961: Barber & Don January tied at 277, Barber won playoff 67 to 68]; died Sep 9, 1994

1917 – Ella Fitzgerald
Grammy Award-winning singer [12]: Bill Bailey Won’t You Please Come Home, Mack the Knife, A-Tisket, A-Tasket; died June 15, 1996

1921 – Melissa Hayden (Mildred Herman)
ballerina: New York City Ballet; died Aug 9, 2006

1923 – Albert King (Nelson)
blues singer, guitarist: Don’t Throw Your Love on Me So Strong, Think Twice before You Speak, Born under a Bad Sign, Cold Feet; died Dec 21, 1992

1930 – Paul Mazursky
director: Harry and Tonto, An Unmarried Woman, Scenes from a Mall, The Pickle, Moscow on the Hudson, Down and Out in Beverly Hills, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Tempest

1932 – Willis ‘Gator’ Jackson
composer, tenor sax: invented the gator horn: Chuck’s Chuckles, Dance of the Lady Bug, Back Door, Later Gator; married to singer Ruth Brown; died Oct 25, 1987

1932 – Meadowlark (George) Lemon
basketball: Harlem Globetrotters

1933 – Jerry Leiber
record producer with Mike Stoller: Hard Times, Smokey Joe’s Cafe, Up on the Roof, On Broadway, Chapel of Love; died Aug 22, 2011

1933 – J. Anthony Lukas
Pulitzer Prize-winning author: Common Ground: A Turbulent Decade in the Lives of Three American Families; died June 5, 1997); died June 5, 1997

1935 – Robert Gutowski
U.S. pole vaulter: world record: 4.78m. [April 27, 1957; died Aug 3, 1960

1940 – Al (Alfredo James) Pacino
Academy Award-winning actor: Scent of a Woman [1992]; Scarface, Serpico, The Godfather, Dick Tracy; Tony Award-winning actor: Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie [1969], The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel [1977]

1945 – Stu Cook
musician: bass: group: Creedence Clearwater Revival: Susie Q, Proud Mary, Keep on Chooglin’, Green River, Lodi, Bad Moon Rising, Wrote a Song for Everyone, Midnight Special, Down on the Corner, Up Around the Bend, Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Who’ll Stop the Rain, Have You Ever Seen the Rain, Someday Never Comes

1945 – Bjorn Ulvaeus
musician: guitar, singer: group: Abba: Waterloo, Dancing Queen, I Have a Dream, LPs: The Album, Voulez-Vous, Super Trouper, The Visitors, Spanish Album, Arrival

1946 – Terry Hermeling
football: Washington Redskins tackle: Super Bowl VII

1946 – Talia Shire (Coppola)
actress: Godfather series, Rocky series, For Richer, For Poorer, A Century of Women, Blood Vows; sister of Producer/Director Francis Ford Coppola

1947 – Jeffrey DeMunn
actor: Ragtime, Frances The Shawshank Redemption, Rocket Man, The X Files, The Green Mile

1949 – Michael Brown (Lookofsky)
musician: keyboards: group: The Left Banke: Walk Away Renee, Pretty Ballerina, Desiree

1952 – Don Martineau
hockey: NHL: Atlanta Flames, Minnesota North Stars, Detroit Red Wings [all-star: 1976-1977]

1964 – Andy Bell
singer: group: Erasure: Sometimes, LP: Wonderland

Today In History – March 7, 2012

1854 – Charles Miller received a patent for the sewing machine that stitches buttonholes! Imagine what our clothes would be like without buttonholes! We’d use Velcro? Safety pins? Fishing hooks? Snaps? Paper clips? Staples? All of the above? And just why is it that women’s clothes have buttonholes on the opposite side of men’s clothes? Yet, so many women wear men’s clothes. It’s all so confusing. Time to take a nap to think about it. 1876 – Alexander Graham Bell of Salem, MA ‘rang’ up a patent for his invention, the telephone. It was an invention, incidentally, that almost bankrupted his company in the beginning. Now, it’s his invention that almost bankrupts those of us who use the phone to call long distance each month…

1911 – Willis Farnsworth of Petaluma, CA patented the coin-operated locker. So, if you hang around the bus or train station or visit an amusement park today, remember this when placing your belongings inside a locker. And remember, we are not responsible for lost or stolen articles. Thank you.

1933 – CBS radio debuted the first daytime radio serial on this day. Marie the Little French Princess had a successful run of two years on the air.

1939 – Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians recorded one of the most popular songs of the century. The standard, Auld Lang Syne, was recorded for Decca Records … about two months and a week late, we’d say.

1944 – Norman Corwin hosted a program titled, Columbia Presents Corwin on the CBS radio network this day. It was the first time the show was broadcast.

1946 – Grauman’s Chinese Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard was the site of the 18th Annual Academy Awards celebration. Bob Hope hosted the first half of the show with James Stewart stepping up to the mike for the second half. The Best Motion Picture of 1945 was Paramount’s The Lost Weekend, produced by Charles Brackett. It also won for Best Director (Billy Wilder), Best Actor (Ray Milland), and Best Writing of a Screenplay (Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder). The Oscar for Best Actor in a Supporting Role went to James Dunn for A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Best Actress was Joan Crawford for her perfomance in Mildred Pierce. The votes for The Best Actress in a Supporting Role prize went to Anne Revere for National Velvet. The Best Music/Scoring of a Musical Picture Oscar went to Georgie Stoll for Anchors Aweigh and Best Music/Song was It Might as Well Be Spring (from State Fair) by Oscar Hammerstein II and Richard Rodgers.

1954 – Russia defeated Canada 7-2 to capture the world ice-hockey title in Stockholm, Sweden. It marked the first time that Russia participated in the ice-hockey competition and started a dynasty — until being checked by Team USA in the 1980 Winter Olympics at Lake Placid, NY.

1955 – Peter Pan, with Mary Martin and Cyril Richard, was presented as a television special for the first time.

1955 – Comedienne Phyllis Diller made her debut at the Purple Onion in San Francisco, CA, leading to a stage, club and television career that spanned more than three decades … and as many facelifts.

1955 – Baseball commissioner Ford Frick indicated that he was in favor of legalizing the spitball. The commissioner said, “It’s a great pitch.” Many, like Gaylord Perry and others would agree, but the rules never changed to allow the dastardly pitch. Catchers often said that when catching a spitball, one needed to wear a raincoat for protection.

1956 – Lonnie Donegan’s hit song, Rock Island Line, was doing well on the pop music charts from across the big pond. The popular music from Great Britain’s ‘King of Skiffle’ ushered in the new music craze called ‘skiffle’. Donegan was born in Glasgow, Scotland and was a member of Chris Barber’s Jazz Band. He had one other major hit on the U.S. pop charts even bigger than Rock Island Line. In 1961, Donegan’s Does Your Chewing Gum Lose It’s Flavor (On the Bedpost Over Night) made it to the top five in America. The song was a top-10 hit in 1924 by Ernest Hare and Billy Jones. However, instead of “Chewing Gum” in the original title, it was “Spearmint”. Donegan recorded his version of the song in 1959, two years before it became a hit. Incidentally, John Lennon and George Harrison of The Beatles both started their careers in skiffle bands. I’m Casey Kasem in Hollywood and the countdown continues…

1985 – The song We Are the World, from the album of the same name, was played on the radio for the first time. Forty-five of pop music’s top stars had gathered together to combine their talents to record the music of Lionel Richie and Michael Jackson. Richie and Jackson sang, too, while Quincy Jones did the producing of the USA for Africa record. The proceeds of the multimillion-selling recording went to aid African famine victims. The project, coordinated by Ken Kragen, was deemed a huge success.

1987 – World Boxing Council (WBC) heavyweight champ, ‘Iron’ Mike Tyson, became the youngest heavyweight titlist ever as he beat James Smith in a decision during a 12-round bout in Las Vegas.

NOTABLE BIRTHDAYS 1849 – Luther Burbank naturalist: creator of new varieties of flowers, trees, edible fruits and vegetables; died Apr 11, 1926 1875 – Maurice Ravel composer: Bolero; died Dec 28, 1937

1908 – Anna Magnani actress: The Rose Tattoo, The Miracle, The Fugitive Kind, Bellissimo: Images of the Italian Cinema; died Sep 26, 1973

1917 – Lee Young jazz musician: drummer: Nat King Cole Trio, Lee Young Band; died Jul 31, 2008

1922 – Andy Phillip NBA Basketball Hall of Famer: Univ. of Illinois [‘floor general’: Whiz Kids]; Philadelphia Warriors, Atlanta Hawks, Detroit Pistons; Associated Press all-time All-American team [1950]; died Apr 29, 2001

1923 – Mahlon Clark musician: clarinet/reeds: Lawrence Welk’s band; died Sep 20, 2007

1927 – James Broderick actor: Alice’s Restaurant, Dog Day Afternoon; died Nov 1, 1982

1930 – Tom (Thomas James) Acker baseball: pitcher: Cincinnati Redlegs, Cincinnati Reds

1934 – Willard Scott (Willard Herman Scott Jr.) weatherman: Today show

1938 – Homero Blancas golf: champ: Phoenix Open [1972]

1938 – Janet Guthrie auto racer: first woman in Indianapolis 500; International Women’s Sports Hall of Famer

1940 – Daniel J. Travanti Emmy Award-Winning actor: Hill Street Blues [1980-81, 1981-82], Weep No More My Lady

1942 – Tammy Faye Bakker (Tamara Faye LaValley) TV evangelist; once married to founder of PTL CLub, Jim Bakker; died Jul 20, 2007

1942 – Pete Beathard football: Kansas City Chiefs quarterback: Super Bowl I

1943 – Bill MacMillan hockey: NHL: Toronto Maple Leafs, Atlanta Flames, NY Islanders; coach/GM: New Jersey Devils

1943 – Rick (Richard) Redman football: Washington State, Univ. of Washington; San Diego Chargers

1943 – Chris White musician: bass: group: The Zombies: She’s Not There, You Make Me Feel Good, Tell Her No, She’s Coming Home, I Want You Back Again, Time of the Seasons

1945 – John Heard actor: The Pelican Brief, Radio Flyer, Home Alone series, Rambling Rose, The Milagro Beanfield War, Big, Beaches, First Love, Between the Lines, Perfect Murder, Perfect Town

1946 – Matthew Fisher musician: organ: group: Procol Harum: Whiter Shade of Pale; solo: LPs: Journey’s End, I’ll be There, Matthew Fisher, Strange Days; operated own recording studio

1946 – Peter Wolf (Blankfield) singer: group: J. Geils Band: Centerfold; Lights Out, Freeze-Frame; married Faye Dunaway

1950 – Franco Harris Pro Football Hall of Famer: Pittsburgh Steelers running back: Super Bowl IX, X, XIII, XIV

1950 – Bernie MacNeil hockey: NHL: SL Blues

1950 – Billy Joe DuPree football: Dallas Cowboys tight end: Super Bowl X, XII, XIII

1951 – Jeff Burroughs baseball: Washington Senators, Texas Rangers [all-star: 1974], Atlanta Braves [all-star: 1978], Seattle Mariners, Oakland Athletics, Toronto Blue Jays

1952 – Lynn Swann Pro Football Hall of Famer: Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver: Super Bowl IX, X, XIII, XIV; TV sportscaster

1960 – Ivan Lendl tennis champion: Australian Open [1989,1983,1990], French Open [1984, 1986, 1987], U.S. Open [1985, 1986, 1987]

1966 – Paul Davis musician: keyboards: group: Happy Mondays

Source: 440.com

Today In History – March 6, 2012

1646 – We go waaaay back in time to when Joseph Jenkes of Massachusetts received the first machine patent. Trouble was, though he had patent in hand, he didn’t quite have a clue as to just what machine he patented, since there were no machines back then. His supposed reply to getting the patent, anyway, was, “Hey! Thanks!” 1808 – The first college orchestra was founded — at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA. So, strike up the band today!

1941 – Les Hite and his orchestra recorded The World is Waiting for the Sunrise on Bluebird Records. The instrumental became Hite’s most popular work. A decade later, Les Paul and Mary Ford added a vocal to the tune, making it one of their biggest-selling hit songs.

1947 – The USS The Newport News was launched from a shipbuilding yard at Newport News, VA. It was the first air-conditioned naval ship.

1948 – Ralph Edwards created a quiz on radio’s Truth or Consequences called The Walking Man. After ten weeks of guesses by contestants playing the game, it was finally revealed that Jack Benny was The Walking Man.

1962 – Frank Sinatra recorded his final session for Capitol Records in Hollywood. Sinatra had been recording for his own record label, Reprise, for two years. His final side on Capitol was I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues, with Skip Martin’s orchestra.

1964 – Tom O’Hara ran the mile in 3 minutes, 56.4 seconds, setting a world indoor record in Chicago, IL. And he still didn’t beat that speedy dromedary.

1976 – The Waylon & Willie (Jennings and Nelson) song, Good Hearted Woman, started the last of three weeks at the top of the country music charts. Waylon and Willie wrote the song in 1969 during a poker game in Ft. Worth, TX. According to Jennings, “I’d been reading an ad for Ike and Tina Turner and it said, ‘Tina Turner singing songs about good-hearted women loving good-timing men.’ I thought, ‘What a great country song title that is!’” He was mighty correct, y’all.

1981 – Walter Cronkite, the dean of American television newscasters, said “And that’s the way it is” for the final time, as he closed the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite. An audience estimated at 17,000,000 viewers saw ‘the most trusted man in America’ sign-off. Cronkite retired after more than 30 years in broadcasting. He was replaced by Dan Rather at the anchor desk.

1982 – The most points scored by two teams in the National Basketball Association made history. San Antonio beat Milwaukee 171-166 in three overtime periods to set the mark.

1983 – The United States Football League began its first season of pro football competition. Fans didn’t support the new spring league opposition to the National Football League and, as a result, team names such as the Bandits, Breakers, Blitz, Invaders and Wranglers were relatively short-lived. The league was forced to fold amid controversy, low fan acceptance and lower television ratings. It was not long before players began to scramble for spots in the NFL. The USFL lasted two seasons.

1985 – Yul Brynner played his famous role as the king in The King and I in his 4,500th performance in the musical. The actor, age 64, opened the successful production on Broadway in 1951.

 

NOTABLE BIRTHDAYS: 1926 – Alan Greenspan economist: chairperson: U.S. Federal Reserve Board [1987-2006]

1927 – (Leroy) Gordon Cooper U.S. astronaut: one of original seven Mercury astronauts [orbited earth 22 times aboard Faith 7 (Mercury 9): May 15, 1963]; flew on Gemini 5 [1965], set flight record of 190 hours, 55 minutes, orbiting the earth 120 times; died Oct 4, 2004

1928 – Gabriel Garcia-Marquez author: A Hundred Years of Solitude, Love in the Time of Cholera

1937 – Valentina Tereshkova-Nikolaeva Russian cosmonaut

1939 – Cookie (Octavio Victor Rivas) Rojas baseball: Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies [all-star: 1965], KC Royals [all-star: 1971-1974], SL Cardinals

1941 – Willie (Wilver Dornel) Stargell Baseball Hall-of-Famer: Pittsburgh Pirates [all-star: 1964-1966, 1971-1973, 1978/World Series: 1971, 1979: MVP/Baseball Writer’s Award: 1979/AP Male Athlete of the Year: 1979]; 475 career homers: lead N.L. twice [48: 1971, 44: 1973]; drove in 1,540 runs, scored 1,195, 2,232 hits, lifetime batting average of .282

1942 – Ben Murphy actor: The Winds of War, The Chisholms, Time Walker, Alias Smith and Jones, Yours, Mine and Ours

1944 – Mary Wilson singer: group: The Supremes: Where Did Our Love Go, Baby Love, Come See About Me, Stop! In the Name of Love, Back in My Arms Again, I Hear a Symphony, Nothing But Heartaches, You Can’t Hurry Love, You Keep Me Hanging On, My World is Empty Without You

1945 – Hugh Grundy musician: drums: group: The Zombies: She’s Not There, You Make Me Feel Good, Tell Her No, She’s Coming Home, I Want You Back Again, Time of the Seasons

1945 – Bob Trumpy football: Cincinnati; broadcaster

1947 – Kiki Dee (Pauline Matthews) singer: Don’t Go Breaking My Heart, Amoureuse, [You Don’t Know] How Glad I Am, Star

1947 – Dick Fosbury Olympic Gold Medalist and record holder: high jump [7’, 4 1/4″, 1968]; National Track & Field Hall of Famer: 1st to break 7’ indoors; invented the Fosbury Flop high jump technique

1947 – Rob Reiner Emmy Award-winning Best Supporting Actor/Comedy Series: All In the Family [1973-74, 1977-78], Postcards from the Edge, Sleepless in Seattle; director: When Harry Met Sally, This is Spinal Tap, The Princess Bride, A Few Good Men; Carl’s son

1959 – Tom Arnold actor: Roseanne, The Jackie Thomas Show, Tom, True Lies

1972 – Shaquille O’Neal basketball: Orlando Magic: NBA Rookie of the Year [1993]; LA Lakers

Today In History – March 3, 2012

1845 – The U.S. Congress passed legislation overriding a President’s veto. It was the first time Congress had done so. President John Tyler was in office at the time. 1845 – Florida became the 27th state of the United States of America. The word ‘Florida’ comes from the Spanish ‘feast of flowers’. But we call it the Sunshine State. The capital of the Sunshine State is … no, not Walt Disney World … Tallahassee. The state flower is the fragrant orange blossom and the mockingbird is the state bird. Do you think the mockingbird can mimic Donald Duck? Or maybe it sings the Florida state song, “Suwannee River”. The Florida state motto is: “In God we trust.”

1915 – The now-famous film, “The Birth of a Nation”, debuted in New York City. The motion picture brought Lillian Gish, Mae Marsh and Wallace Reid to the silver screen in what has frequently been called the greatest silent film ever produced.

1923 – The first issue of the weekly periodical “TIME” appeared on newsstands. The first issue was 32 pages and featured a charcoal sketch of Congressman Joseph Gurney Cannon on the cover. It was the United States’ first, modern, news magazine. Today, the worldwide news weekly, founded by Henry Luce and Briton Hadden, is printed in several languages and is among the most popular magazines in history with readership of 3.3 million.

1930 – Bert Lahr (“The Wizard of Oz”) and Kate (“God Bless America”) Smith starred in “Flying High” as it opened at the Apollo Theatre in New York City. The show had a run of 45 weeks at what is now the most famous black entertainment theatre in America.

1931 – Cab Calloway and his orchestra recorded “Minnie the Moocher” on Brunswick Records. It was the first recording of the famous bandleader’s theme song. The song was featured prominently in the motion picture, “The Blues Brothers” (1980), starring John Belushi and Dan Ackroyd.

1931 – “The Star-Spangled Banner”, written by Francis Scott Key, officially became the national anthem of the United States. Despite the fact that millions sing (in a manner of speaking) the anthem before sporting events, civic club meetings and other public gatherings, it is still ranked as the most difficult national anthem on earth to sing.

1938 – A world record for the indoor mile run was set at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Glenn Cunningham made the distance in 4 minutes, 4.4 seconds.

1939 – Oh, those crazy college kids: A new craze began to sweep college campuses. The much publicized fad began to take shape at the Ivy League’s Harvard University. It was perceived as being kind of ‘fishy’, however, coming from the button-down minds at Harvard. In fact, it was deemed quite unbelievable for such a prestigious school of higher learning. The fad? Goldfish swallowing. (Gulp!)

1945 – Mystery fans remember this day when they gathered around the radio set to listen to the Mutual Broadcasting System as Superman encountered Batman and Robin for the first time. POW! ZING! BONK!

1952 – “Whispering Streets” debuted on ABC radio, remaining on the air until Thanksgiving week, 1960. The end of that show brought down the curtain on what is called “the last day of the radio soap opera” (November 25, 1960).

1959 – The new home of the San Francisco Giants baseball team was officially named Candlestick Park. The name was chosen in a contest to name the newly-built stadium. The contest winner didn’t have to look far, as the windswept and chilly confines of the National League stadium are located just a few hundred feet from Candlestick Point, on San Francisco Bay. In 1995, the venerable name, Candlestick Park was changed to 3Com Park, after a relatively small (at the time) local area computer software developer bid a half-million dollars for the rights to the stadium name — beating out such giants as Apple Computer, IBM and others.

1966 – Lou Christie was striking gold for his hit “Lightnin’ Strikes”. Christie was born Lugee Sacco and joined a group called The Classics before making his first recording in 1960. In 1961, he recorded under the name Lugee & The Lions until changing to Lou Christie for a string of hits beginning in 1963. Other notable tunes from Christie’s top 40 appearances include: “The Gypsy Cried”, “Two Faces Have I”, “Rhapsody in the Rain” and “I’m Gonna Make You Mine” — all displaying his trademark falsetto voice, similar to that of Frankie Valli of The Four Seasons. “Lightnin’ Strikes” was Christie’s only million seller.

1985 – Kevin McHale from the University of Minnesota set a Boston Celtics scoring record this night as he poured in 56 points in a 138-129 win over the Detroit Pistons.

1987 – Actor, singer, dancer, comedian, broadcaster and American entertainment icon, Danny Kaye, died in Los Angeles at the age of 74.

Today In History – March 2, 2012

1866 – The Excelsior Needle Company of Wolcottville, Connecticut began making sewing machine needles. 1903 – The Martha Washington Hotel opened for business in New York City. The hotel featured 416 rooms and was the first hotel exclusively for women.

1925 – State and federal highway officials developed a nationwide route-numbering system and adopted the familiar U.S. shield-shaped numbered marker. For instance, in the east, there is U.S. 1 that runs from New England to Florida and in the west, the corresponding highway, U.S. 101, from Tacoma, WA to San Diego, CA.

1927 – Babe Ruth signed a 3-year contract with the New York Yankees for a guarantee of $70,000 a year, thus becoming baseball’s highest paid player.

1940 – The first televised intercollegiate track meet was seen by TV viewers in New York City as W2XBS presented the action live from Madison Square Garden. New York University won the meet.

1944 – The 16th Academy Awards celebration moved from a banquet hall to Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood; hosted by comedian/actor Jack Benny. The Outstanding Motion Picture was Casablanca, directed by Michael Curtiz, who won an Oscar for his efforts. Best Actor of 1943 was Paul Lukas for Watch on the Rhine and Best Actor in a Supporting Role was Charles Coburn for The More the Merrier. The Best Actress award was presented to Twenty-four-year-old Jennifer Jones for The Song of Bernadette and Best Actress in a Supporting Role was Katina Paxinou in For Whom the Bell Tolls. Stephen Dunn of The RKO Radio Studio Sound Department and Sound Director for This Land is Mine, picked up the Oscar for … what else? … Sound Recording. Best Music, Song winners were Harry Warren (music), Mack Gordon (lyrics) for the song, You’ll Never Know, from the movie Hello, Frisco, Hello. And, did you know that the United States Navy received an Oscar? It was for the Documentary (Short Subject) they produced, December 7th. That was fun. Now, let’ go outside and look at all the hand prints in the cement along the boulevard.

1957 – Teenage heartthrob Tab Hunter’s song Young Love was number one in the U.S.

1958 – British geologist Dr. Vivian Fuchs reached McMurdo Sound in the Ross Sea, thus completing the first crossing of Antarctica by land. As a part of the International Geophysical Year, the Commonwealth of Nations organized the expedition, which covered 2,158 miles (3,473 kilometers).

1962 – Wilt ‘The Stilt’ Chamberlain scored 100 points and broke an NBA record as the Philadelphia Warriors beat the New York Knicks 169-147. Chamberlain broke NBA marks for the most field goal attempts (63), most field goals made (36), most free throws made (28), most points in a half (59), most field goal attempts in a half (37), most field goals made in a half (22), and most field goal attempts in one quarter (21). The 316 total points scored tied an NBA record. What’s not known is if Chamberlain set the record for most gallons of sweat pouring off a man’s body during a game.

1974 – Stevie Wonder got five Grammy Awards for his album, Innervisions and his hit songs, You Are The Sunshine of My Life and Superstition.

1974 – U.S. Postage stamps jumped from eight to ten cents this day for first-class mail. This way, your first-class letter came with a first-class price as well! Just wait another 20 years and see what happened…

1984 – The first McDonald’s franchise was closed — in Des Plaines, IL. After 30 years of selling burgers, Mickey D’s opened a new drive-in restaurant right across the McStreet.

1985 – Country singer Gary Morris hit #1 on the country charts for the first time with Baby Bye Bye, from his album, Faded Blue.

1987 – Government officials reported that the median price for a new home had topped $100,000 for the first time. The new six-figure price: $110,700, actually, was up from $94,600.

1999 – Singer Dusty Springfield (Wishin’ and Hopin’, The Look of Love, Son of a Preacher Man) lost her battle with breast cancer. She was 59 years old.

2001 – These films opened in the U.S.: The Mexican, starring Brad Pitt. Julia Roberts, James Gandolfini and Bob Balaban; and See Spot Run, with David Arquette, Michael Clarke Duncan, Leslie Bibb and Joe Viterelli.

Today In History – March 1, 2012

1826 – J.H. Hackett of New York debuted in Love in a Village at the Park Theatre in New York City. One month later, he played in London, England, becoming the first American actor to appear abroad.

1867 – The Cornhusker State, aka the Beef State, aka the Tree Planter State, aka Nebraska (37th state), entered the United States of America. Nebraska means ‘flat water’ in Oto Indian speak. Lincoln is the official seat of Nebraska government. Nebraska’s motto: Equality before the law. The western meadowlark holds the honor of being the state bird; while the goldenrod takes its place as the state flower. Other state symbols include the cottonwood tree (state tree); the honeybee (state insect); blue agate (state gemstone); whitetail deer (state mammal); mammoth (state fossil); prairie agate (state rock); Beautiful Nebraska (state song) … that’s original … and, the state soil: typic arguistolls, Holrege Series. State soil?

1869 – Postage stamps depicting scenes were issued for the first time in the U.S.

1873 – E. Remington and Sons of Ilion, NY began the manufacturing of the first practical typewriter. The strong as steel, heavy black clunkers became instant fixtures in offices across the country. It would be another half-century before electric typewriters made their appearance.

1890 – Readers picked up copies of the Literary Digest for the first time.

1912 – Captain Albert Berry of the Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis, MO made the first parachute jump from a moving airplane. He jumped from an altitude of 1,500 feet at a speed of 50 mph.

1928 – Paul Whiteman and his orchestra recorded Ol’ Man River for Victor Records. The featured vocalist on the track was 29-year-old Paul Robeson. The song became an American classic.

1932 – Radio’s greatest effort of on-the-spot news coverage began as NBC and CBS radio rushed to Hopewell, NJ to cover the kidnapping of the Charles and Anne Lindbergh baby.

1937 – U.S. Steel raised workers’ wages. If you were a steelworker, you got a raise to $5 a day. That’s right. About 40 cents an hour. Now, punch that time clock and quit your complaining.

1941 – Duffy’s Tavern debuted on CBS radio — and became a popular hit for 10 years.

1949 – ‘The Brown Bomber’, Joe Louis, announced that he was retiring from boxing as world heavyweight boxing champion. Louis held the title longer than any other champ — 11 years, eight months and seven days.

1968 – Country music stars Johnny Cash and June Carter got married on this day. Johnny walked down the aisle knowing that his 1956 hit, Folsom Prison Blues, was about to be redone for a June release. Cash has a daughter, Rosanne, (previous marriage) who became a country star in her own right in the 1980s.

1968 – Elton John’s first record, I’ve Been Loving You, was released by Philips Records in England. Philips, not realizing the potential of the soon-to-be superstar, released him in 1969, just prior to his teaming with lyricist Bernie Taupin. Elton then signed a contract with Uni Records and began to turn out what would become a string of more than 50 hits over the next 25 years.

1969 – Mickey Mantle announced his retirement from baseball on this day. ‘Number 7’ was considered to be the final link to the great Yankee dynasty of the 1950s and 1960s. Mantle’s World Series records include: home runs (18), runs scored (42), RBIs (40), walks (43) and strikeouts (54). Mickey Mantle died in 1995.

1985 – A Beatles song was used for the first time in a U.S. TV commercial. The rights for Lincoln-Mercury to use the song, HELP!, cost $100,000, helping boost the fortunes of the automaker known as Ford Motor Company.

1986 – Mr. Mister’s Kyrie rose to #1 on in the U.S. The single was a track from the album Welcome to the Real World, which became the #1 album in the U.S. this day.

1987 – The Boston Celtics defeated Detroit 112-102 to post win number 2,235.

1987 – S&H Green Stamps became S&H Green Seals on this day, 90 years after the lick-and-stick stamps were introduced as a way for businesses to bonus their customers — who then used the stamps to buy merchandise from catalog stores. The stamps became peel-and-seal stamps along with the name change.

1996 – Up Close & Personal opened in U.S. theatres. The romantic drama stars Robert Redford, Michelle Pfeiffer, Stockard Channing and Joe Mantegna. A song from the flick, Because You Loved Me, was nominated for Best Music and Song at the 1997 Academy Awards.

1999 – Some 130 nations agreed to a United Nations Treaty banning land mines which went into effect this day. The U.S., Russia and China did not sign the treaty.

In Honor of Women’s History Month, Photographer, Olivia Barrionuevo’s Latest Work Featured at The Consulate of Mexico in Los Angeles Opening, March 1

Olivia Barrionuevo, nationally recognized photographer and photojournalist, captures the soul of the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations in her latest exhibit, ‘The Ancient Mexicans’ on display during Women’s History Month.

NEW YORK, NY, February 28, 2012  — Olivia Barrionuevo, nationally recognized photographer and photojournalist, captures the soul of the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations in her latest exhibit, ‘The Ancient Mexicans.’ The exhibit will be on display at The Consulate General of Mexico in an exclusive gallery chosen by the Art Culture of Mexico.

“I am very honor to present at the Mexican Consulate since this is a part of Mexico away from home,” said Barrionuevo.

The Consulate General of Mexico in Los Angeles presents the exhibit, March 1-30 with an exclusive exhibit opening on March 1 at 6 p.m. The Ancient Mexicans is a unique look into Mexican culture and tradition, portrayed through Barrionuevo’s lens.

“During my career as a photojournalist, I traveled with President- to- be Ernesto Zedillo, during his campaign,” said Barrionuevo. “We visited San Cristobal de Las Casas, Mexico. There I was to encounter for the first time the history and culture of the Chamulas, and Zapotecs I became completely captivated by their Maya traditions, culture, and life styles. Their amazing ability to endure and survive so many centuries. As an artist I wanted to capture their body, soul, pride and sprit without being literal to what I was seeing. It was at that moment “The Ancient Mexicans” project was conceived.”

In addition to covering Mexican presidential campaigns and photographing feature films, Barrionuevo has been awarded impressive internships at the Los Angeles Times and has studied with the renowned Annie Leibovitz. She is currently working on a book production of her work and seeking national publication.

Her photographs have been exhibited at The Center for Fine Arts, The Museum of Tolerance, University of Judaism, Self-Help Graphics, the Center for Fine Art Photography, The Historical Lummis House, and Belenky Gallery in New York. Her work is also featured as a permanent collection of Centro de la Imagen in Mexico, City.

She has won numerous awards, Book of the Month by A&I, most recently she is the recipient of prestigious honors by the International Photography Awards (IPA) in the Advertising, Portraiture and Children category. Additionally she has received awards from the Center for Fine Art Photography and Women in Photography.

The Ancient Mexicans will run through the month of March at the Consulate General of Mexico in Los Angeles located at 2401 West 6th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90057. For more information you can call 213 351 6845 or email: AsuntosCulturalesMx@gmail.com, to see more of Barrionuevo you can visit www.oliviabarrionuevo.com or facebook.com/oliviabarrionuevo

Today In History – January 31, 2012

 

 

 

Did you know, that today in history, these events took place?  Go ahead! Share this…. Tweet or Re-tweet…

1990 – 1st McDonalds in Russia opens in Moscow, world’s biggest McDonalds
1990 – 1st ever all-sports daily “National” begins publishing
1990 – Jushin “Thunder” Liger beats Naoki Sano to become New Japan IWGP champ
1990 – The first McDonald’s in the Soviet Union opens in Moscow, USSR.
1991 – Nugget’s Michael Adams becomes shortest NBAer to get a triple-double
1991 – Robert Gibson flies record 27,040 feet altitude
1992 – MTA raised tolls on most NYC bridges from $2.50 to $3.00
1993 – “St Joan” opens at Lyceum Theater NYC for 49 performances
1993 – 81st Australian Mens Tennis: Jim Courier beats S Edberg (62 61 26 75)
1993 – Superbowl XXVII: Dallas Cowboys beat Buffalo Bills, 52-17 in Pasadena Superbowl MVP: Troy Aikman, Dallas, QB
1994 – Barcelona opera theater “Gran Teatro del Liceo” burns down
1994 – Dow Jones hits a record 3,978.36
1995 – President Bill Clinton authorizes a $20 billion loan to Mexico to stabilize its economy.
1998 – 72nd Australian Womens Tennis: Martina Hingis beats C Martinez (63 63)
1998 – STS 89 (Endeavour 12) lands
2000 – Alaska Airlines flight 261 MD-83, experiencing horizontal stabilizer problems, crashes in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Point Mugu, California, killing all 88 persons aboard.
2001 – In the Netherlands a Scottish court convicts a Libyan and acquits another for their part in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 which crashed into Lockerbie, Scotland in 1988.
2003 – The Waterfall rail accident occurs near Waterfall, New South Wales, Australia.
2007 – Suspects are arrested in Birmingham in the UK, accused of plotting the kidnap, holding and eventual beheading of a serving Muslim British soldier in Iraq.
2009 – In Kenya, at least 113 people are killed and over 200 injured following an oil spillage ignition in Molo, days after a massive fire at a Nakumatt supermarket in Nairobi killed at least 25 people.