A new Tribute Album for the Bee Gee’s by the Gibb Family Honoring Their Legacy; CubeSats (Small Satellites) Changing Possibilities in Space and More at 24-7PressRelease.com

Gibb family honors their legacy with Bee Gee's tribute album - Press Release.A group of brothers (Barry, Maurice and Robin Gibb) that came together back in 1958 and took the stage by storm – were talking about the Bee Gees.  The amazing trio had decades of success that many of us can remember back to with extraordinary accomplishments in the late 60’s into the 70’s.

The trio, according to an article at WikiPedia were active between years 1958 – 2003, then again from 2009 – 2012 with labels including Warner Bros., Capitol and Polydor to name a few.

The group was known for writing all their own music, something that is not as popular in this day and age.  They may also be credited with becoming one of the world’s best-selling music artists of all time with over 220 million records sold worldwide. Back in 1997 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Through a press release distributed at 24-7PressRelease.com, the next generation of Gibbs has made an announcement of a project honoring their music with a new interpretations of classic songs headed up by Maurice’s daughter Samantha.  The full press release details may be found through our main site 24-7PressRelease.com

Switching subjects over to space, NASA is almost like a household name or brand.  Not quite in every household, but there are not many whom are not familiar with the name.

Are you familiar with what a CubeSat is? If you are a follower of space exploration and NASA, you may take an interest in these small devices that are helping to provide more insight into scientific investigations and technology.  Some of these CubeSats measure as tiny as four inches on each side and are now being adopted by many organizations outside of NASA for exploration of low-earth orbit and the effects of microgravity.

Check out the latest press release at 24-7 Press Release Newswire mentioning the details and benefits of CubeSats here.

Would you like to increase your online visibility by using a press release service like 24-7PressRelease.com?  Choose a package that is right for you and get started today.

Don’t forget to also check out our Knowledge Base for tips and information on how to write a press release that may be found here.

Recent News at NASA and the Results of one Year in Space From Press Release Service 24-7PressRelease.com

Many of us have been familiar with NASA since our early childhood memories – pretty much since Neil Armstrong stepped foot on the moon.  News always came out in the evening newspapers and occasionally, we might catch a clip of space related news from afar. At that time, if it was outside the city limits, it was far away.

Times have changed and with it, technology to keep us up to date of every going on that we have an interest in.

Through press release service 24-7PressRelease.com, NASA has done a phenomenal job of keeping the media and public up to date with their latest space science press release news.

In particular, a recently submitted press release, titled ‘How Stressful Will a Trip to Mars be on the Human Body? We Now Have a Peek Into What the NASA Twins Study Will Reveal’ peaked the curiosity of many of our visitors.

The press release was a preliminary research study of NASA Twins whereby one twin made the International Space Station his home for a period of one year while the other remained on earth.

The researchers attained biological samples that were taken from each of the twins before, during and after the mission and comparing the results to find out how the body would be affected by long term space visits.

Want to find out more about some of the preliminary results? Be sure to check out the full press release here.

A second press release submitted to 24-7PressRelease.com again from NASA discusses some of the space station research highlights of the one year journey.  A few of the highlights include the first ever sequencing of DNA in space a number of investigations across multiple science related subjects.  Find out more about this project titled “2016 Space Station Research Highlights” here.

Looking for more information and updates from NASA, with over 300 press releases from them in our database, you may want to set aside a lot of time to read.  Check them out here.

News Distribution Service 24-7PressRelease.com What’s on Update July 10th – July 22.

NASA Press Release AnnouncementThere is always exciting news and information happening within the world of 24-7 Press Release Newswire.  Here are a few press releases submitted July 10th – July 22nd that caught the attention of our editorial.

  1. Pardee Homes is a fairly regular user of the 24-7 Press Release Newswire distribution service. Pardee specializes in creating new homes and communities. Their specialty is for luxury home buyers adopting green home building measures combined with environmentally sensitive development practices.

Find out about their new phase of homes released for sale at Flagstone in Beaumont through their latest press release submitted July 10, 2016 here.

With pricing anticipated to begin in the high $200,000 range, Pardee has recognized new homes designed to appeal to first-time purchasers within the Sundance master-planned community.

  1. What do Saide Robertson and Roma Boots have in common? Find out from their latest press release, distributed July 19th (Dallas, TX).  Roma Boots Teams Up with Sadie Robertson for Second Collection of Rain Boots to Help Children in Poverty.

Our editorial likes the concept behind this company and their thinking because it supports a worthy cause by donating a pair of rain boots to a child in need for every pair that they sell.  This is such a fantastic cause.  The business (Roma Boots) was founded by Samuel Bistrian through inspiration to give back to the children in his home country of Romania.

  1. There are not too many people that do not like to know the latest information from NASA. Just last week we saw the announcement of their ‘Analog Missions Webapge’.

NASA‘s Human Research Program launched Phase 1 of the NASA Analog Missions website, a site devoted to studies around the world that help prepare for long duration human spaceflight. This latest press release may be found here.

24-7PressRelease.com distribution service occasionally showcases businesses and their press release when it receives higher than normal attention or views.  These press releases are hand-picked by our editorial.  We try to not select the same businesses repeatedly, however sometimes this may occur for particularly interesting stories.

24-7 Press Release Newswire – A Week of Press in Review June 20 – 24 2016

The Humanity Party (THumP)

The Humanity Party (THumP)

The past week has been a whirl-wind of some differentiating press releases distributed through the 24-7PressRelease.com network including submissions from Anonymous and their announcement of a worldwide political movement called The Humanity Party (THumP) which has garnered much media attention.

Also popular this week includes a press release submission from Arrowhead Publishers and Conferences, with their news of “Key Leaders in Precision & Personalized Medicine To Meet This Fall for the 8th Annual Personalized & Precision Medicine Conference

And last but not least, some information from Abode Systems, Inc. about “abode’s IoT and Home Security Platform Makes Connected Home Accessible to Visually Impaired and Blind Community”
NASA Press Release - You are what you eat.
Don’t forget to also check out one of NASA’s recent posts about “NASA Releases “Metabolomics: You Are What You Eat” Video”.  This press release and others may be found at: http://www.nasa.gov/feature/video-highlights-mark-and-scott-kellys-metabolites-metabolomics-you-are-what-you-eat

NASA Space Radiation School is Totally Radical

A veritable physics and biology mashup exposes students to a broad spectrum of space radiation research and expertise.

NASA Press ReleaseHOUSTON, TX, September 19, 2014 /24-7PressRelease/ — For many students, the idea of summer school is anything but inspiring. Students of the 2014 NASA Space Radiation Summer School (NSRSS) might disagree. The students, experts in their respective fields of study, were recently immersed in three weeks of intense education, collaboration and perhaps most importantly, inspiration.

Education

The school, a veritable physics and biology mashup, exposes students to a broad spectrum of space radiation research and expertise. Indeed, many students see the summer school as an opportunity to better themselves as scientists and bridge biology and physics.

“These students–an outright brain trust–learn nitty-gritty space radiation physics and biology,” said John Norbury, who served as director of this year’s school. “The school sensitizes them to the various factors of space radiation, which is one of the most critical aspects of getting to Mars.”

According to Peter Guida, NASA liaison biologist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) where the school is held, the purpose of the school is to teach the students how to think critically about global issues and problems related to radiation, how to design experiments and how to execute them.

“We want to get students on a pathway to make sure there are no gaps in space radiation science research,” said Guida.

According to Guida, the summer school provides students with an experience that they could not receive anywherein the world. During their time at the summer school, students hear lectures from 30 to 33 distinguished experts in the field who address topics not taught in the average classroom. They also participate in cell-based experiments that teach them to detect DNA damage, detect changes in cell death and toxicity, and measure cell replication. Additionally, they learn about BNL’s particle accelerators, the radiation beam, and how to write a beam time proposal, which is key to obtaining time at BNL’s NASA Space Radiation Laboratory where researchers conduct experiments. The students — largely students with advanced degrees — are selected through a highly competitive application process.

The school offers some intangible things as well, namely collaboration and inspiration.

Collaboration

The NSRSS strives to get biologists and physicists on the same wavelength, all learning from one another and forging relationships with scientists in fields they normally would have not had an opportunity to meet otherwise.

“I am a biologist and I know which challenges we have, but to get a better understanding of the challenges the physicists face in this field is something that has changed and improved the way I perceive the whole field,” said Pil Fredericia, NSRSS student and doctoral student at the Technical University of Denmark. “I think that is the most valuable lesson I have received from this whole experience.”

Fellow student Wouter de Wet agrees.

“The largest impact for me both personally and professionally was the relationships I formed with the other students,” says de Wet. “I now have colleagues and friends in all parts of the space radiation research field with whom I am certain I will collaborate in the future. If it had not been for this experience, I would probably never have met any of them.”

Inspiration

Hand in hand with the school’s objective of helping students understand why space radiation is important is the goal of inspiring them.

“We need young experts in the field with new insights,” said Norbury who adds that their measure of success is how much they have inspired students.

To date, more than 30 percent of NSRSS students have returned to BNL as researchers and, based on student feedback, this year’s school was a resounding success.

“I was really taken aback by the number of such highly acknowledged researchers in the field that took their time to come and lecture,” said Fredericia. “To be in an environment with such skilled people with so much knowledge was really inspiring to me. It made me look at my own research from another perspective. It made me think about other implications of my research.”

NASA Pathway Scholar and doctoral candidate Samrawit Yeshitla noted that the session enhanced confidence in her current work, adding, “NASA scientists gave us a lifetime of knowledge and left us to think about how we can help NASA prepare for long duration missions.”

“I do believe this program is key to one day meeting our goal of putting a person on the surface of Mars,” agreed de Wet. “It brings together researchers from all areas of the field and helps you realize that you are a part of a much larger team than your own research group–all trying to reach the same goal.”

Maybe the idea of an inspiring summer school isn’t such a radical idea after all.

Everything in Moderation: Micro-8 to Study Regulating Pathogens in Space

Scientists want to address controlling outbreaks of Candida albicans, an opportunistic yeast pathogen, with the next round of cellular growth experiments on the International Space Station — Micro-8.

NASA Press ReleaseHOUSTON, TX, September 19, 2014 /24-7PressRelease/ — Our bodies are breeding grounds for microbes — don’t worry, it’s a good thing! As scientists have been telling us for years, not all microbes are bad. Many active enzymes and bacteria are merely benign, and, in moderation, are beneficial to humans as an important part of our digestive system or can help regulate our immune system.

Candida albicans, an opportunistic yeast pathogen and model organism for research, is common and usually doesn’t damage our healthy personal ecosystem. However, when our immune system is stressed on Earth or in space, such as during long-duration space travel, C. albicans can grow out of control and potentially cause infections. Scientists want to address controlling these outbreaks with the next round of cellular growth experiments on the International Space Station — Micro-8.

Results from a recent set of tests on the station, called Micro-6, encouraged further study into the impact of spaceflight on the cellular behavior of these microbes. During the investigation, scientists discovered C. albicans grew to a more elongated form, grew into an altered structure when forming a colony and, perhaps most importantly, showed an increased resistance to the antimicrobial agent Amphotericin B. The combination of these factors could result in an increase of the infectious nature of this opportunistic pathogen.

This is why scientists will continue to study C. albicans in Micro-8, scheduled for delivery on the fourth commercial cargo resupply flight of the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft, targeted to launch Sept. 20, 2014. The investigation on the orbiting laboratory will allow scientists to better understand the growth and development of these microbes, which, in turn, can help develop treatment for infections both in space and on Earth.

“We already understand a great deal about this particular yeast,” said Sheila Nielsen, Ph.D., principal investigator for the Micro-6 and Micro-8 missions at Montana State University in Bozeman. “Previous studies have given us a broad set of benchmarks, including the sequence of the entire genome, which makes Candida albicans a great subject for study in microgravity because we have extensive information to compare it to.”

Designed to examine how spaceflight affects potentially infectious organisms, the Micro-8 investigation will provide new insights into better management and treatment of C. albicans infections when they occur on Earth as well as in space, and may offer ways to combat other microbial pathogens. By comparing the cells grown in microgravity to cells grown in gravity, the research team will examine several parameters, including the susceptibility of the yeast to antimicrobial agents.

Micro-8 will directly build on the Micro-6 study. It also will include a second antifungal agent to better understand the yeast response to different antimicrobial agents.

One of the most important evolutions of the Micro-8 investigation is the introduction of human monocytes — or blood cells — as a host. Astronauts on the orbiting laboratory will test the yeast growth on monocytes in an enclosed and controlled facility called the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA). The CGBA is an incubator capable of controlling the temperature between 46 and 98 degrees F.

“We have already demonstrated that microgravity affects cell shape and behavior,” said Nielsen. “A more complete understanding of the yeast adaptation response to extreme environments, such as microgravity, and the risks associated with potential infection is vital for long-term crew health and safety. With that knowledge, we can develop treatments to keep our astronauts and our Earth population healthier.”

Micro-8 is funded and managed through NASA Space Biology at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. The payload developer is BioServe Space Technologies in Boulder, Colorado. Space Biology is funded by the Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

So, while we don’t want to eliminate all of the bacteria and yeast microbes from our system, scientists are using the orbiting laboratory to discover ways to keep them in check on Earth and in space.

By Bill Hubscher
International Space Station Program Science Office
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

New Article Posted by NASA – “Science off the Sphere” Astronaut Don Pettit Wins NASA Engineer of the Year

NASA Press ReleaseExcellent article from NASA mentioning astronaut Don Pettit being awarded the NASA Engineer of the Year award from the National Society of Professional Engineers/Professional Engineers in Government.

Pettit was a flight engineer during Expedition 30/31 aboard the International Space Station.

Find the full press release at:http://24-7pressrelease.com/press-release/quotscience-off-the-spherequot-astronaut-don-pettit-wins-nasa-engineer-of-the-year-351074.php