Recent News at NASA and the Results of one Year in Space From Press Release Service 24-7PressRelease.com

Many of us have been familiar with NASA since our early childhood memories – pretty much since Neil Armstrong stepped foot on the moon.  News always came out in the evening newspapers and occasionally, we might catch a clip of space related news from afar. At that time, if it was outside the city limits, it was far away.

Times have changed and with it, technology to keep us up to date of every going on that we have an interest in.

Through press release service 24-7PressRelease.com, NASA has done a phenomenal job of keeping the media and public up to date with their latest space science press release news.

In particular, a recently submitted press release, titled ‘How Stressful Will a Trip to Mars be on the Human Body? We Now Have a Peek Into What the NASA Twins Study Will Reveal’ peaked the curiosity of many of our visitors.

The press release was a preliminary research study of NASA Twins whereby one twin made the International Space Station his home for a period of one year while the other remained on earth.

The researchers attained biological samples that were taken from each of the twins before, during and after the mission and comparing the results to find out how the body would be affected by long term space visits.

Want to find out more about some of the preliminary results? Be sure to check out the full press release here.

A second press release submitted to 24-7PressRelease.com again from NASA discusses some of the space station research highlights of the one year journey.  A few of the highlights include the first ever sequencing of DNA in space a number of investigations across multiple science related subjects.  Find out more about this project titled “2016 Space Station Research Highlights” here.

Looking for more information and updates from NASA, with over 300 press releases from them in our database, you may want to set aside a lot of time to read.  Check them out here.

NASA Space Radiation School is Totally Radical

A veritable physics and biology mashup exposes students to a broad spectrum of space radiation research and expertise.

NASA Press ReleaseHOUSTON, TX, September 19, 2014 /24-7PressRelease/ — For many students, the idea of summer school is anything but inspiring. Students of the 2014 NASA Space Radiation Summer School (NSRSS) might disagree. The students, experts in their respective fields of study, were recently immersed in three weeks of intense education, collaboration and perhaps most importantly, inspiration.

Education

The school, a veritable physics and biology mashup, exposes students to a broad spectrum of space radiation research and expertise. Indeed, many students see the summer school as an opportunity to better themselves as scientists and bridge biology and physics.

“These students–an outright brain trust–learn nitty-gritty space radiation physics and biology,” said John Norbury, who served as director of this year’s school. “The school sensitizes them to the various factors of space radiation, which is one of the most critical aspects of getting to Mars.”

According to Peter Guida, NASA liaison biologist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) where the school is held, the purpose of the school is to teach the students how to think critically about global issues and problems related to radiation, how to design experiments and how to execute them.

“We want to get students on a pathway to make sure there are no gaps in space radiation science research,” said Guida.

According to Guida, the summer school provides students with an experience that they could not receive anywherein the world. During their time at the summer school, students hear lectures from 30 to 33 distinguished experts in the field who address topics not taught in the average classroom. They also participate in cell-based experiments that teach them to detect DNA damage, detect changes in cell death and toxicity, and measure cell replication. Additionally, they learn about BNL’s particle accelerators, the radiation beam, and how to write a beam time proposal, which is key to obtaining time at BNL’s NASA Space Radiation Laboratory where researchers conduct experiments. The students — largely students with advanced degrees — are selected through a highly competitive application process.

The school offers some intangible things as well, namely collaboration and inspiration.

Collaboration

The NSRSS strives to get biologists and physicists on the same wavelength, all learning from one another and forging relationships with scientists in fields they normally would have not had an opportunity to meet otherwise.

“I am a biologist and I know which challenges we have, but to get a better understanding of the challenges the physicists face in this field is something that has changed and improved the way I perceive the whole field,” said Pil Fredericia, NSRSS student and doctoral student at the Technical University of Denmark. “I think that is the most valuable lesson I have received from this whole experience.”

Fellow student Wouter de Wet agrees.

“The largest impact for me both personally and professionally was the relationships I formed with the other students,” says de Wet. “I now have colleagues and friends in all parts of the space radiation research field with whom I am certain I will collaborate in the future. If it had not been for this experience, I would probably never have met any of them.”

Inspiration

Hand in hand with the school’s objective of helping students understand why space radiation is important is the goal of inspiring them.

“We need young experts in the field with new insights,” said Norbury who adds that their measure of success is how much they have inspired students.

To date, more than 30 percent of NSRSS students have returned to BNL as researchers and, based on student feedback, this year’s school was a resounding success.

“I was really taken aback by the number of such highly acknowledged researchers in the field that took their time to come and lecture,” said Fredericia. “To be in an environment with such skilled people with so much knowledge was really inspiring to me. It made me look at my own research from another perspective. It made me think about other implications of my research.”

NASA Pathway Scholar and doctoral candidate Samrawit Yeshitla noted that the session enhanced confidence in her current work, adding, “NASA scientists gave us a lifetime of knowledge and left us to think about how we can help NASA prepare for long duration missions.”

“I do believe this program is key to one day meeting our goal of putting a person on the surface of Mars,” agreed de Wet. “It brings together researchers from all areas of the field and helps you realize that you are a part of a much larger team than your own research group–all trying to reach the same goal.”

Maybe the idea of an inspiring summer school isn’t such a radical idea after all.

Everything in Moderation: Micro-8 to Study Regulating Pathogens in Space

Scientists want to address controlling outbreaks of Candida albicans, an opportunistic yeast pathogen, with the next round of cellular growth experiments on the International Space Station — Micro-8.

NASA Press ReleaseHOUSTON, TX, September 19, 2014 /24-7PressRelease/ — Our bodies are breeding grounds for microbes — don’t worry, it’s a good thing! As scientists have been telling us for years, not all microbes are bad. Many active enzymes and bacteria are merely benign, and, in moderation, are beneficial to humans as an important part of our digestive system or can help regulate our immune system.

Candida albicans, an opportunistic yeast pathogen and model organism for research, is common and usually doesn’t damage our healthy personal ecosystem. However, when our immune system is stressed on Earth or in space, such as during long-duration space travel, C. albicans can grow out of control and potentially cause infections. Scientists want to address controlling these outbreaks with the next round of cellular growth experiments on the International Space Station — Micro-8.

Results from a recent set of tests on the station, called Micro-6, encouraged further study into the impact of spaceflight on the cellular behavior of these microbes. During the investigation, scientists discovered C. albicans grew to a more elongated form, grew into an altered structure when forming a colony and, perhaps most importantly, showed an increased resistance to the antimicrobial agent Amphotericin B. The combination of these factors could result in an increase of the infectious nature of this opportunistic pathogen.

This is why scientists will continue to study C. albicans in Micro-8, scheduled for delivery on the fourth commercial cargo resupply flight of the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft, targeted to launch Sept. 20, 2014. The investigation on the orbiting laboratory will allow scientists to better understand the growth and development of these microbes, which, in turn, can help develop treatment for infections both in space and on Earth.

“We already understand a great deal about this particular yeast,” said Sheila Nielsen, Ph.D., principal investigator for the Micro-6 and Micro-8 missions at Montana State University in Bozeman. “Previous studies have given us a broad set of benchmarks, including the sequence of the entire genome, which makes Candida albicans a great subject for study in microgravity because we have extensive information to compare it to.”

Designed to examine how spaceflight affects potentially infectious organisms, the Micro-8 investigation will provide new insights into better management and treatment of C. albicans infections when they occur on Earth as well as in space, and may offer ways to combat other microbial pathogens. By comparing the cells grown in microgravity to cells grown in gravity, the research team will examine several parameters, including the susceptibility of the yeast to antimicrobial agents.

Micro-8 will directly build on the Micro-6 study. It also will include a second antifungal agent to better understand the yeast response to different antimicrobial agents.

One of the most important evolutions of the Micro-8 investigation is the introduction of human monocytes — or blood cells — as a host. Astronauts on the orbiting laboratory will test the yeast growth on monocytes in an enclosed and controlled facility called the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA). The CGBA is an incubator capable of controlling the temperature between 46 and 98 degrees F.

“We have already demonstrated that microgravity affects cell shape and behavior,” said Nielsen. “A more complete understanding of the yeast adaptation response to extreme environments, such as microgravity, and the risks associated with potential infection is vital for long-term crew health and safety. With that knowledge, we can develop treatments to keep our astronauts and our Earth population healthier.”

Micro-8 is funded and managed through NASA Space Biology at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. The payload developer is BioServe Space Technologies in Boulder, Colorado. Space Biology is funded by the Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

So, while we don’t want to eliminate all of the bacteria and yeast microbes from our system, scientists are using the orbiting laboratory to discover ways to keep them in check on Earth and in space.

By Bill Hubscher
International Space Station Program Science Office
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

NASA, NSBRI Select 29 Proposals to Support Crew Health on Missions

Release: H12-162

WASHINGTON, DC, May 25, 2012 — NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP) and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) of Houston will fund 29 proposals to help investigate questions about astronaut health and performance on future deep space exploration missions.

The selected proposals are from 25 institutions in 11 states and will receive a total of about $26 million over a one- to three-year period.

A major area of emphasis for both HRP and NSBRI has been the recently identified issue of visual impairment in astronauts during and after long-duration spaceflight. In addition, eight of the selected proposals will examine several facets of this poorly understood syndrome.

HRP and NSBRI research provides knowledge and technologies to improve human health and performance during space exploration and develops possible countermeasures for problems experienced during space travel. The organizations’ goals are to help astronauts complete their challenging missions successfully and preserve astronauts’ health throughout their lives.

HRP quantifies crew health and performance risks during spaceflight and develops strategies that mission planners and system developers can use to monitor and mitigate the risks. These studies often lead to advancements in understanding and treating illnesses in patients on Earth.

The 29 projects were selected from 104 proposals received in response to the research announcement “Research and Technology Development to Support Crew Health and Performance in Space Exploration Missions.”

Scientific and technical experts from academia and government reviewed the proposals. NASA will manage 14 of the projects; NSBRI will manage 15.

NSBRI is a NASA-funded consortium of institutions studying health risks related to long-duration spaceflight. The Institute’s science, technology and education projects take place at more than 60 institutions across the United States.

For a complete list of the selected principal investigators, organizations and proposals, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/LlGsLz   For information about NASA’s Human Research Program, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/humanresearch/   For information about NSBRI’s science, technology and education programs, visit:

http://www.nsbri.org   For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov   Additional Contact: Brad Thomas  National Space Biomedical Research Institute, Houston  713-798-7595  rbthomas@bcm.edu

Source: Press Release Distribution http://www.24-7pressrelease.com/press-release/nasa-nsbri-select-29-proposals-to-support-crew-health-on-missions-282491.php